Roger Sedarat

Author, Poet, and Professor of Creative Writing

About

Author of four poetry books including upcoming Haji as Puppet: an Orientalist Burlesque, (Word Works. 2017). Winner of 2016 Tenth Gate Prize for Mid-Career Poets, Leslie McGrath, judge and just released Foot Faults: Tennis Poems (David Robert Books, 2016). Also, author of  Dear Regime: Letters to the Islamic Republic, which won Ohio University Press’s Hollis Summers’ Prize, and Ghazal Games (Ohio UP, 2011).

In addition to teaching creative writing (poetry and literary translation) in the MFA program at Queens College, City University of New York, he teaches and writes on such academic interests as 19th and 20th century American literature as well as Middle Eastern-American literature. Currently, Roger is working toward translating a full-length collection of ghazals by the 14th century Sufi Persian poet, Hafez.

Books

Haji as Puppet

February 2017
Winner of 2016 Tenth Gate Prize for Mid-Career Poets, Leslie McGrath, judge.

Written in a style that is as sure-footed as it is experimental, Dear Regime: Letters to the Islamic Republic confronts the past and current injustices of the Iranian government while retaining a sense of respect and admiration for the country itself. Woven into this collection are the author’s vivid descriptions of the landscape as well as the people of Iran. Throughout, Sedarat exhibits a keen appreciation for the literary tradition of Iran, and in making it new, attempts to preserve the culture of a country he still claims as his own

Foot Faults

September 2016 

Listen to the greatest tennis players in the world hold court in Roger Sedarat’s fine collection, exploring love and faults as they struggle, not always well, to stay within the lines.

“These poems give delightful shape and concision to every thought — stray, deep-felt, nagging — you’ve had as a tennis player. Read them, recognize yourself, and smile.” — Gerald Marzorati, author of Late to the Ball: Age. Learn. Fight. Love.  Play Tennis. Win and former editor of New York Times Magazine.

Ghazal Games

December 2012

For its humor as well as its spirituality, the poems in this collection can perhaps best be described as “Wallace Stevens meets Rumi.” Perhaps most striking is the poet’s use of the ancient ghazal form in the tradition of the classical masters like Hafez and Rumi to politically challenge the Islamic Republic of Iran’s continual crackdown on protesters. Not since the late Agha Shahid Ali has a poet translated the letter as well as the spirit of this form into English, using musicality and inventive rhyme to extend the reach of the ghazal in a new language and tradition.

Dear Regime

September 2007 

Winner of Ohio University Press’s Hollis Summers’ Prize

Written in a style that is as sure-footed as it is experimental, Dear Regime: Letters to the Islamic Republic confronts the past and current injustices of the Iranian government while retaining a sense of respect and admiration for the country itself. Woven into this collection are the author’s vivid descriptions of the landscape as well as the people of Iran. Throughout, Sedarat exhibits a keen appreciation for the literary tradition of Iran, and in making it new, attempts to preserve the culture of a country he still claims as his own

Coming Feb 2017

Order: Foot Fault

Order: Ghazal Games

Order: Dear Regime

FOOT FAULTS: “These poems give delightful shape and concision to every thought — stray, deep-felt, nagging — you’ve had as a tennis player. Read them, recognize yourself, and smile.”

Gerald MarzoratiAuthor of Late to the Ball: Age. Learn. Fight. Love. Play Tennis. Win and former editor of New York Times Magazine.

GHAZAL GAMES: “Playfully, humorously, Sedarat confronts issues such as religious hypocrisy and dogma head on…. Though Ghazal Games may appear a broadly experimental endeavor at first, its tone and carefully crafted phraseology remain consistent throughout. It is an excellent educational tool for creative writers and, as the following selections demonstrate, a delightful read.”

Frontline, “Tehran Bureau”

FOOT FAULTS: "This lovely collection solidifies my belief that tennis is a metaphor for life. Our job is to get the ball back over the net just one more time.”

Abraham VergheseAuthor of Cutting for Stone and The Tennis Partner.

DEAR REGIME: “We can only hope the regime will welcome the humanity and talent so palpable in this book, which we in the U.S. should gratefully welcome, too.”
The Ledge

The Ledge

Reviews

Contact

ROGER SEDARAT, PHD

Department of English
Queens College, City University of New York
65-30 Kissena Blvd. ,
Flushing NY, 11367
Roger.Sedarat@qc.cuny.edu
718-997-4713